Downsampling (decimating) a brain surface

Downsampled average cortical surfaces at different iterations (n), with the respective number of vertices (V), edges (E) and faces (F).

In the previous post, a method to display brain surfaces interactively in PDF documents was presented. While the method is already much more efficient than it was when it first appeared some years ago, the display of highly resolved meshes can be computationally intensive, and may make even the most enthusiastic readers give up even opening the file.

If the data being shown has low spatial frequency, an alternative way to display, which preserves generally the amount of information, is to decimate the mesh, downsampling it to a lower resolution. Although in theory this can be done in the native (subject-level) geometry through retessellation (i.e., interpolation of coordinates), the interest in downsampling usually is at the group level, in which case the subjects have all been interpolated to a common grid, which in general is a geodesic sphere produced by subdividing recursively an icosahedron (see this earlier post). If, at each iteration, the vertices and faces are added in a certain order (such as in FreeSurfer‘s fsaverage or in the one generated with the platonic command), downsampling is relatively straightforward, whatever is the type of data.

Vertexwise data

For vertexwise data, downsampling can be based on the fact that vertices are added (appended) in a certain order as the icosahedron is constructed:

  • Vertices 1-12 correspond to n = 0, i.e., no subdivision, or ico0.
  • Vertices 13-42 correspond to the vertices that, once added to the ico0, make it ico1 (first iteration of subdivision, n = 1).
  • Vertices 43-162 correspond to the vertices that, once added to ico1, make it ico2 (second iteration, n = 2).
  • Vertices 163-642, likewise, make ico3.
  • Vertices 643-2562 make ico4.
  • Vertices 2563-10242 make ico5.
  • Vertices 10243-40962 make ico6, etc.

Thus, if the data is vertexwise (also known as curvature, such as cortical thickness or curvature indices proper), the above information is sufficient to downsample the data: to reduce down to an ico3, for instance, all what one needs to do is to pick the vertices 1 through 642, ignoring 643 onwards.

Facewise data

Data stored at each face (triangle) generally correspond to areal quantities, that require mass conservation. For both fsaverage and platonic icosahedrons, the faces are added in a particular order such that, at each iteration of the subdivision, a given face index is replaced in situ for four other faces: one can simply collapse (via sum or average) the data of every four faces into a new one.

Surface geometry

If the objective is to decimate the surface geometry, i.e., the mesh itself, as opposed to quantities assigned to vertices or faces, one can use similar steps:

  1. Select the vertices from the first up to the last vertex of the icosahedron in the level needed.
  2. Iteratively downsample the face indices by selecting first those that are formed by three vertices that were appended for the current iteration, then for those that have two vertices appended in the current iteration, then connecting the remaining three vertices to form a new, larger face.

Applications

Using downsampled data is useful not only to display meshes in PDF documents, but also, some analyses may not require a high resolution as the default mesh (ico7), particularly for processes that vary smoothly across the cortex, such as cortical thickness. Using a lower resolution mesh can be just as informative, while operating at a fraction of the computational cost.

A script

A script that does the tasks above using Matlab/Octave is here: icodown.m. It is also available as part of the areal package described here, which also satisfies all its dependencies. Input and output formats are described here.

Interactive 3D brains in PDF documents

A screenshot from Acrobat Reader. The example file is here.

Would it not be helpful to be able to navigate through tri-dimensional, surface-based representations of the brain when reading a paper, without having to download separate datasets, or using external software? Since 2004, with the release of the version 1.6 of the Portable Document Format (PDF), this has been possible. However, the means to generate the file were not easily available until about 2008, when Intel released of a set of libraries and tools. This still did not help much to improve popularity, as in-document rendering of complex 3D models requires a lot of memory and processing, making its use difficult in practice at the time. The fact that Acrobat Reader was a lot bloated did not help much either.

Now, almost eight years later, things have become easier for users who want to open these documents. Newer versions of Acrobat are much lighter, and capabilities of ordinary computers have increased. Yet, it seems the interest on this kind of visualisation have faded. The objective of this post is to show that it is remarkably simple to have interactive 3D objects in PDF documents, which can be used in any document published online, including theses, presentations, and papers: journals as PNAS and Journal of Neuroscience are at the forefront in accepting interactive manuscripts.

Requirements

  • U3D Tools: Make sure you have the IDTFConverter utility, from the U3D tools, available on SourceForge as part of the MathGL library. A direct link to version 1.4.4 is here; an alternative link, of a repackaged version of the same, is here. Compiling instructions for Linux and Mac are in the “readme” file. There are some dependencies that must be satisfied, and are described in the documentation. If you decide not to install the U3D tools, but only compile them, make sure the path of the executable is both in the $PATH and in the $LD_LIBRARY_PATH. This can be done with:
cd /path/to/the/directory/of/IDTFConverter
export PATH=${PATH}:$(pwd)
export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=${LD_LIBRARY_PATH}:$(pwd)
  • The ply2idtf function: Make sure you have the latest version of the areal package, which contains the MATLAB/Octave function ply2idtf.m used below.
  • Certain LaTeX packages: The packages movie15 or media9, that allow embedding the 3D object into the PDF using LaTeX. Either will work. Below it is assumed the older, movie15 package, is used.

Step 1: Generate the PLY maps

Once you have a map of vertexwise cortical data that needs to be shown, follow the instructions from this earlier blog post that explains how to generate Stanford PLY files to display colour-coded vertexwise data. These PLY files will be used below.

Step 2: Convert the PLY to IDTF files

IDTF stands for Intermediate Data Text Format. As the name implies, it is a text, intermediate file, used as a step before the creation of the U3D files, the latter that are embedded into the PDF. Use the function ply2idtf for this:

ply2idtf(...
   {'lh.pial.thickness.avg.ply','LEFT', eye(4);...
    'rh.pial.thickness.avg.ply','RIGHT',eye(4)},...
    'thickness.idtf');

The first argument is a cell array with 3 columns, and as many rows as PLY files being added to the IDTF file. The first column contains the file name, the second the label (or node) that for that file, and the third an affine matrix that maps the coordinates from the PLY file to the world coordinate system of the (to be created) U3D. The second (last) argument to the command is the name of the output file.

Step 3: Convert the IDTF to U3D files

From a terminal window (not MATLAB or Octave), run:

IDTFConverter -input thickness.idtf -output thickness.u3d

Step 4: Configure default views

Here we use the older movie15 LaTeX package, and the same can be accomplished with the newer, media9 package. Various viewing options are configurable, all of which are described in the documentation. These options can be saved in a text file with extension .vws, and later supplied in the LaTeX document. An example is below.

VIEW=Both Hemispheres
  COO=0 -14 0,
  C2C=-0.75 0.20 0.65
  ROO=325
  AAC=30
  ROLL=-0.03
  BGCOLOR=.5 .5 .5
  RENDERMODE=Solid
  LIGHTS=CAD
  PART=LEFT
    VISIBLE=true
  END
  PART=RIGHT
    VISIBLE=true
  END
END
VIEW=Left Hemisphere
  COO=0 -14 0,
  C2C=-1 0 0
  ROO=325
  AAC=30
  ROLL=-0.03
  BGCOLOR=.5 .5 .5
  RENDERMODE=Solid
  LIGHTS=CAD
  PART=LEFT
    VISIBLE=true
  END
  PART=RIGHT
    VISIBLE=false
  END
END
VIEW=Right Hemisphere
  COO=0 -14 0,
  C2C=1 0 0
  ROO=325
  AAC=30
  ROLL=0.03
  BGCOLOR=.5 .5 .5
  RENDERMODE=Solid
  LIGHTS=CAD
  PART=LEFT
    VISIBLE=false
  END
  PART=RIGHT
    VISIBLE=true
  END
END

Step 5: Add the U3D to the LaTeX source

Interactive, 3D viewing is unfortunately not supported by most PDF readers. However, it is supported by the official Adobe Acrobat Reader since version 7.0, including the recent version DC. Thus, it is important to let the users/readers of the document know that they must open the file using a recent version of Acrobat. This can be done in the document itself, using a message placed with the option text of the \includemovie command of the movie15 package. A minimalistic LaTeX source is shown below (it can be downloaded here).

\documentclass{article}

% Relevant package:
\usepackage[3D]{movie15}

% pdfLaTeX and color links setup:
\usepackage{color}
\usepackage[pdftex]{hyperref}
\definecolor{colorlink}{rgb}{0, 0, .6}  % dark blue
\hypersetup{colorlinks=true,citecolor=colorlink,filecolor=colorlink,linkcolor=colorlink,urlcolor=colorlink}

\begin{document}
\title{Interactive 3D brains in PDF documents}
\author{}
\date{}
\maketitle

\begin{figure}[!h]
\begin{center}
\includemovie[
text=\fbox{\parbox[c][9cm][c]{9cm}{\centering {\footnotesize (Use \href{http://get.adobe.com/reader/}{Adobe Acrobat Reader 7.0+} \\to view the interactive content.)}}},
poster,label=Average,3Dviews2=pial.vws]{10cm}{10cm}{thickness.u3d}
\caption{An average 3D brain, showing colour-coded average thickness (for simplicity, colour scale not shown). Click to rotate. Right-click to for a menu with various options. Details at \href{http://brainder.org}{http://brainder.org}.}
\end{center}
\end{figure}

\end{document}

Step 6: Generate the PDF

For LaTeX, use pdfLaTeX as usual:

pdflatex document.tex

What you get

After generating the PDF, the result of this example is shown here (a screenshot is at the top). It is possible to rotate in any direction, zoom, pan, change views to predefined modes, and alternate between orthogonal and perspective projections. It’s also possible to change rendering modes (including transparency), and experiment with various lightning options.

In Acrobat Reader, by right-clicking, a menu with various useful options is presented. A toolbar (as shown in the top image) can also be enabled through the menu.

The same strategy works also with the Beamer class, such that interactive slides can be created and used in talks, and with XeTeX, allowing these with a richer variety of text fonts.

See also

  • Wikipedia has an article on U3D files.
  • Alexandre Gramfort has developed a set of tools that covers quite much the same as above. It’s freely available in Matlab FileExchange.
  • To display molecules interactively (including proteins), the steps are similar. Instructions for Jmol and Pymol are available.
  • Commercial products offering features that build on these resources are also available.

Merging multiple surfaces

Say you have a number of meshes in FreeSurfer ascii format (with extension *.asc or *.srf), one brain structure per file. However, for later processing or to import in some computer graphics software, you would like to have these multiple meshes all in a single file. This post provides a small script to accomplish this: mergesrf.

To use it, right click and save the file above, make it executable and, ideally, put it in a place where it can be found (or add its location to the environmental variable ${PATH}. Then run something as:

mergesrf file1.srf file2.srf fileN.srf mergedfile.srf

In this example, the output file is saved as mergedfile.srf. Another example is to convert all subcortical structures into just one large object, after aseg2srf as described here. To convert all, just change the current directory to ${SUBJECTS_DIR}/<subject_name>/ascii, then run:

mergesrf * aseg_all.srf

A list with the input files and the output at the end is shown below:

The script uses Octave, which can be downloaded freely. The same script, with a small modification, can also run from inside matlab. This other version can be downloaded here: mergesrf.m

Requirements

In addition to Octave (or matlab), the script also requires functions to read and write surface files, which are available from the areal package (described here and downloadable here).

Brain meshes available

A set of 3D brain meshes produced with FreeSurfer and individually partitioned into separate files following the atlases of Desikan-Killiany, Destrieux et al., and Desikan-Killiany-Tourville (DKT), is now available for download here. Surfaces for subcortical structures are also available.

These meshes are meant to be used to help with scientific visualisation and/or artistic rendering in computer graphics software, most prominently Blender, but also in any other application that can import files in Wavefront (*.obj) or Stanford Polygon (*.ply) formats. The released files are under a Creative Commons license. See the download page for details.

Facewise brain cortical surface area: scripts now available

https://brainder.org/download/areal

In the paper Measuring and comparing brain cortical surface area and other areal quantities (Neuroimage, 2012;61(4):1428-43, doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.026, pmid:22446492), we described the steps to perform pycnophylactic interpolation, i.e., mass-conservative interpolation, of brain surface area. The method is also valid for any other quantity that is also areal by nature.

The scripts to perform the steps we propose in the paper are now freely available for Octave and/or matlab. They can also be executed directly from the shell using Octave as the interpreter. In this case, multiple instances can be easily submitted to run in a cluster. Click here to dowload and for step-by-step instructions.